Teaching

Masaryk University (2014-now)
  • Human-Computer Interaction (UG and PG) (2017-now): The course deals with basics of human-computer interaction. It is focused on psychological and physiological aspects of interface design, graphical user interface design and its usability assessment. After finishing the course students. At the end of the course, students will be able to: will be able to evaluate existing screen designs; practice in developing human-computer interfaces with respect to a usability; assess the usability of SW products; understand the usability issues of products in general; gain practical knowledge of designing process based on in-depth knowledge of high and low level models of human-computer interaction.
  • Virtual Environments (PG) (2017-now): This course intends to introduce virtual environments to the students. The module covers all major aspects of the greater field of virtual reality such as: the underlying hardware and software technologies, software interfaces, visualization, interaction as well as the most significant application domains. At the end of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the main mathematical concepts, hardware and software technologies used in immersive virtual environments; evaluate different approaches, methodologies and tools focused on virtual reality; propose virtual environments for both indoor and outdoor environments; design virtual reality applications for various application domains.
  • Laboratory of Human-Computer Interaction (2015-now): This course intends to introduce students in Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory and participate in a research of various fields of computer graphics, virtual reality, haptic based interaction etc. At the end of the course students will be able to: familiarize with modern VR equipment installed in the HCI Laboratory; practice usage of graphics and haptics libraries and toolkits; learn to design and assemble computer graphics applications; design and test new human-computer interaction methods; improve their abilities to work in small teams on non-trivial theoretical and practical problems.
  • Augmented Reality Interfaces (PG) (2014-now): This course intends to introduce augmented reality interfaces to the students. The module covers all major aspects of augmented reality such as the underlying hardware and software technologies as well as the most significant application domains. At the end of the course students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the main mathematical concepts, hardware and software technologies used in augmented reality; evaluate different approaches, methodologies and tools focused on augmented reality; propose augmented reality environments for both indoor and outdoor environments; design multimodal augmented reality interfaces for various application domains.
  • Advanced Game Design (PG) (2014-now): This course intends to introduce advanced game design to the students. The course will cover all major aspects of game design such as advanced computer graphics, human computer interaction and game design issues. At the end of the course students will be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of the main mathematical concepts used in computer game design; mathematically model all the components of an interactive computer game; have a good understanding of the collision detection techniques that are used in computer games and apply them in practice; design and implement an interactive computer game from scratch (i.e. not using a game engine).
  • Computer Graphics and Image Processing (PG) (2014-now): This course offers students a deeper knowledge about a chosen field of computer graphics or image processing while working on one of the more complex projects solved in the Laboratory of Human-Computer Interactions or Laboratory of Optical Microscopy, respectively, and will apply this knowledge during the work on a team R&D project. This will strengthen the student's capability of analyzing real-world problems in the given field, finding suitable solutions and working in a scientific team.

Coventry University (2007-2014)
  • Advanced Graphics Programming (UG) (2013-2014): This module develops graphics programming to an advanced level, focusing on the creation of compelling interactive, real-time 3D environments, examples of which may be seen in many game titles. It introduces advanced 3D computer graphics algorithms and techniques to the students. In particular, the module introduces various aspects of computer graphics for games such as advanced rendering techniques and procedural modeling.
  • 3D Graphics Programming (UG) (2007-2014): This module intends to introduce 3D computer games graphic programming fundamentals to the students such as textures, global illumination and the simulation of physical phenomena. The module emphasises the programming aspects of computer graphics, especially the efficient use of advanced Application Programming Interface features.
  • Physics for Computer Graphics (UG) (2007-2014): This module develops the treatment of the physics and mathematics relevant to computer games. It covers the general motion of a rigid body in three dimensional space, including issues of collision of bodies and their subsequent motion.
  • Group Project (UG) (2007-2014): This module allows students to develop skills on how to design and implement a group project (5 to 6 students) in the area of computer science.
  • Interactive Pervasive Computing (UG) (2007-2010): This module allows students to develop skills on how to design and implement interactive pervasive computing applications using wireless sensor networks.
  • Foundations of Serious Games (PG) (2011-2012): This module intends to introduce the theories and literature surrounding the development of Serious Games, and the research undertaken on the effects of Serious Games on affect, engagement, learning and behaviour through an understanding of situative, experiential, cognitivist, and other pedagogic techniques.

City University (2004-2007)
  • Multimedia (PG) (2004-2007): Multimedia aims in demonstrating the importance of planning in a multimedia production environment and some of the tools and techniques used to capture, edit, store and present multimedia data, and in particular audio-visual information.
  • Information Management (UG) (2005-2007): Information management describes and evaluates the relationships between information and knowledge management.
  • Research Evaluation and Communication Skills (PG) (2005-2006): Research Evaluation and Communication Skills (RECS) aims in describing how to develop techniques and skills for carrying out research and project management as well as the effective communication of ideas. This module provides immediate practical benefits both for study on the courses and within the workplace.
  • Information Management Supermodule (PG) (2004-2006): Information and knowledge management aims in describing and evaluating the relationships between information and knowledge, their users and systems with reference to different types of resources and organizations.
  • GeoVisualization (PG) (2004-2005): GeoVisualization aims in getting students thinking about their use and creation of graphics to help them take advantage of the power of maps and charts as a key component of their management of GI.

University of Sussex (2002-2004)
  • Introduction to Information Technology (UG) (2003-2004): The course was focused on the fundamentals of computing including various aspects of IT including the basics of computer structure, introduction to Java programming language, fundamentals of programming and software design, basic programming concepts, OO concepts, introduction to Internet and web-based applications. Furthermore, I was in charge of the preparation of examination questions/solutions, marking of scripts, revision of the course material, design of the lecture notes (35 Lectures and revision class) and the laboratory exercises.
  • Virtual Reality Systems (UG) (2003-2004): I lectured part of the course in Virtual Reality Systems and demonstrated state of the art VR/AR hardware and software technologies to undergraduate students. The aim of the module was to bring together the knowledge gained on previous computer graphics courses coupled with the varied disciplines of virtual reality allowing the development of virtual reality applications.
  • Virtual Environments (PG) (2002-2004): I was part of the team that designed from scratch the 'Virtual Environments' module in 2002. I lectured parts of the course in Virtual Environments and demonstrated state of the art VR/AR hardware and software technologies to postgraduate students. The aim of the module was to bring together the knowledge gained on previous computer graphics courses coupled with the varied disciplines of virtual reality allowing the development of virtual reality applications.